A Quiet Word:
Lobbying, Crony Capitalism
and Broken Politics in Britain

UK lobbying and public affairs activity related to organisations in Wikipedia's Westminster system [1] category, covering activity of:

June 2013

Public Administration Select Committee

Complaints: Do They Make a Difference?

March 2013

Environmental Audit Committee

Minutes of EvidenceHC 201

  • if you are not referring back to that document?Norman Baker: It is partly about attitude. I think there has been a sea change in attitudes, House of Commons, Governments-both the last one and this one-and local councils, who are more prepared to accept that accessibility issues are part and parcel of what they do rather than something you add on at the end. I think that was an attitude in the past that has hopefully gone forever. Similarly, with the transport operators, my personal view is that the response to people with accessibility issues has improved markedly with the train companies, compared to what it was in the past. It is improving as well, although not as fast as I would like, with the bus companies and the response they have to people with accessibility issues. I think there is some way to go with the taxi trade. Again, it is improving but not as fast as I would like. So, the attitude has changed. That is ultimately what is going to drive change.Secondly, there have been regulations that have been helpful and have focused the mind. I include in that the requirement for trains to be fully accessible by 2020, the requirements for buses to be accessible by 2015, 2016, or 2017 (depending on type of bus) and 2020 in terms of coaches used on scheduled services. That focuses the mind and makes sure that we are making progress on that front too. It is also the case that there have been a number of gains, I would not say by accident but as a consequence of other Government policies. For example, the Green Bus Fund, which has been deliberately introduced to reduce carbon emissions from buses, has also had the benefit of replacing inaccessible vehicles. That has meant that the new buses coming in have accessibility criteria that are better than the ones they replaced.So I would say that, by and large, the quality of public transport is improving in terms of accessibility. That is partly driven by attitude, partly by regulation. It is now becoming mainstream. I suppose it is almost a cliché, but it is still relevant gave evidence on 12 Mar.[6]
Environmental Audit Committee

Transport and the Accessibility of Public Services

  • if you are not referring back to that document?Norman Baker: It is partly about attitude. I think there has been a sea change in attitudes, House of Commons, Governments-both the last one and this one-and local councils, who are more prepared to accept that accessibility issues are part and parcel of what they do rather than something you add on at the end. I think that was an attitude in the past that has hopefully gone forever. Similarly, with the transport operators, my personal view is that the response to people with accessibility issues has improved markedly with the train companies, compared to what it was in the past. It is improving as well, although not as fast as I would like, with the bus companies and the response they have to people with accessibility issues. I think there is some way to go with the taxi trade. Again, it is improving but not as fast as I would like. So, the attitude has changed. That is ultimately what is going to drive change.Secondly, there have been regulations that have been helpful and have focused the mind. I include in that the requirement for trains to be fully accessible by 2020, the requirements for buses to be accessible by 2015, 2016, or 2017 (depending on type of bus) and 2020 in terms of coaches used on scheduled services. That focuses the mind and makes sure that we are making progress on that front too. It is also the case that there have been a number of gains, I would not say by accident but as a consequence of other Government policies. For example, the Green Bus Fund, which has been deliberately introduced to reduce carbon emissions from buses, has also had the benefit of replacing inaccessible vehicles. That has meant that the new buses coming in have accessibility criteria that are better than the ones they replaced.So I would say that, by and large, the quality of public transport is improving in terms of accessibility. That is partly driven by attitude, partly by regulation. It is now becoming mainstream. I suppose it is almost a cliché, but it is still relevant gave evidence on 12 Mar.[4]

January 2013

Political and Constitutional Reform Committee

Ensuring Standards in the Quality of Legislation

December 2012

Public Administration Select Committee

Minutes of EvidenceHC 757

June 2012

Procedure Committee (Commons)

Review of the Backbench Business Committee

October 2011

Administration Committee (Commons)

Examination of Witness

Administration Committee (Commons)

Minutes of EvidenceHC 13

Administration Committee (Commons)

Visitor Access and Facilities in the House of Commons

June 2011

Procedure Committee (Commons)

Lay Membership of the Committee oN Standards and Privileges

April 2011

Procedure Committee (Commons)

HC 960

Procedure Committee (Commons)

Lay membership of the Committee on Standards and Privileges

February 2011

Health Committee

Complaints and Litigation

Public Administration Select Committee

Work of the Ombudsman

January 2011

Administration Committee (Commons)

Catering and Retail Services in the House of Commons

November 2010

Administration Committee (Commons)

Catering and Retail Services in the House of Commons

Procedure Committee (Commons)

Ministerial Statements

Standards and Privileges Committee

Privilege: Hacking of Members' mobile phones

October 2010

September 2010

Political and Constitutional Reform Committee

Fixed-term Parliaments Bill

This profile was compiled by Who's Lobbying.

This page is not endorsed by or affiliated with any of the organisations mentioned above.

Problem with this information?

Please let us know by emailing: